"FINDING NEMO 3D" (L-R) NEMO and MARLIN. ©2012 Disney/Pixar. All Rights Reserved.

You can now catch Finding Nemo –dubbed in the Navajo language– on national TV this Christmas Day!

First Nations Experience (FNX), the first and only nationally distributed TV channel in the U.S. exclusively devoted to Native American and World Indigenous programming, announced today that the Oscar®-winning film, Disney-Pixar’s Finding Nemo, will make its broadcast television debut translated in the Navajo language.

Nemo, Dory and Marlin’s underwater tale of friendship and perseverance will air twice on Christmas Day, December 25 at 5 p.m. PST (8 p.m. EST) and 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST) exclusively on FNX.

FNX originates from the studios of KVCR-PBS in the San Bernardino Community College District and is carried by 20 affiliate stations in 20 states from Alaska to New York and available to more than 23 million households across the United States.

The historic broadcast licensing agreement between FNX and The Walt Disney Studios is the first of its kind between any Native American television channel and a major Hollywood studio.

Frank Blanquet, chief content manager for FNX reflected on the significance of dubbing the 2003 blockbuster in Navajo. “This historic partnership between FNX/PBS, a major Hollywood studio and an American Indian Tribe will set precedence on the importance of indigenous language preservation and revitalization.”

The Navajo Nation has about 300,000 members, and its reservation is the largest in the U.S.

“FNX is a model for diversity in television content and we’re thrilled that The Walt Disney Studios sees the value and importance of providing us with this historic broadcast opportunity. It’s a stunning achievement for public television and only appropriate that it happen on FNX. It will be a memorable occasion for millions of people across the country to enjoy this special FNX Christmas Day broadcast with their families,” added Alfredo Cruz, general manager of KVCR/FNX.

Earlier this year, Finding Nemo was the second motion picture to be dubbed into the Navajo language after the successful translation of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 2013.

To see where you can watch FNX/PBS in your area, check here.