The Show Must Go On! Ay Lelum to Showcase at New York Fashion Week Despite Warehouse Fire

Despite a fire that destroyed their warehouse, Ay Lelum will showcase at New York Fashion Week.

September 11, 2021, New York – Ay Lelum The Good House of Design is set to take the city by storm as Sisters Aunalee and Sophia, in collaboration with their family, present their captivating new collection at New York Fashion Week (NYFW) for the SS 2022 Season.  

Despite having a devastating fire that destroyed their warehouse and almost all their stock on August 27th, just weeks before their New York collection showcase, the featured brand is forging ahead to showcase their newest collection on the runway. Thankfully, the fire was contained and everyone was unharmed. Their NYFW showcase collection was spared while it was being produced at their home studio. They plan to continue to share Traditional Coast Salish art through garment design and runway storytelling in a meaningful way.  

GLOBAL FASHION COLLECTIVE (GFC), is a platform supporting creative designers from around the world. The collective produces runway shows in different fashion capitals with the aim to accelerate the designer’s global development, increase their international media visibility, and open new markets. Global Fashion Collective is an expansion from Vancouver Fashion Week, presenting its designers in front of international media and buyers globally. At New York Fashion Week, a diverse line-up of hand-picked talent from around the world will showcase their designs. 

QUOTE FROM DESIGNER: 

Traditionally, Coast Salish carvers, textile artists and musicians documented oral history through Hul’q’umi’num art, which is a complex visual literary system. This was also done with Hul’q’umi’num language through oral storytelling and song. Our approach to the runway is no different, we are carving out history through textile arts and music, sharing both a creation story and documenting our present times with hope and healing for the future. Through garment design, artwork and modern remixes of our music, we are storytellers, sharing our family story of wolves – Stqeeye’, becoming the First Peoples’ through modern applications on textiles, such as rich fur-like velvets and flowy fabrics. We transform from nudes and flesh tones representing creation and we reflect the happenings of our times through oranges and into reds. The showcase also features the Coast Salish Eye of Life, the center of all our consciousness that transcends time. This design represents the emergence of new life and new beginnings, and the collection represents transformation and resilience.  

In our Coast Salish traditions, we are to leave you a good way. We end with a happy song that was passed on by our Great Grandfather (William Good). As we sing with our Father, we leave you with positive thoughts for healing that represent resilience, new life and change.  

*The origin story we share is from the Nanaimo River (Traditionally called Stqeeye’), the very River we live and operate our design house at on Snuneymuxw First Nation, in Nanaimo, B.C., Canada. The story is told by our father, William Good with Traditional Coast Salish artwork by our brother, Joel Good, and is protected by the Hul’q’umi’num Laws that we abide by. 

*The music is recorded with four generations of the Good family, with William Good, Sophia Seward-Good, Aunalee Boyd-Good, Liam Seward-Good, Madyson Harris, Ella Harris, Ava Harris and Holly Harris. Remixed by Rob the Viking. To be released on major streaming platforms soon. 

*Accessories are by Giggy’s Beads Boutique @giggysbeadsboutique / www.giggysbeads.com 

EVENT DETAILS  

Global Fashion Collective I 

Spring/Summer ‘22 

608 Fifth Avenue  

Ground Floor 

Sept. 11, 21  

11:00 am 

For information, visit: www.globalfashioncollective.com  

ABOUT DESIGNER 

AY LELUM THE GOOD HOUSE OF DESIGN is a second-generation Coast Salish Design House from Nanaimo, B.C., Canada.  

This brand of Coast Salish couture and ready-wear is designed and produced in B.C. by Sisters, Aunalee and Sophia. They are mentored in fashion design by their Mother, Sandra Moorhouse-Good, who is instrumental to design execution and construction. They also collaborate with and feature artwork by their Father, Traditional Coast Salish Artist William Good and their Brother, W. Joel Good, from the Snuneymuxw First Nation. They incorporate family designs into the creations of fabrics and patterns and record their own music as part of the design process. Each showcase is inspired by cultural teachings and artwork taught by their Father, while following strict cultural protocols. They combine the ancient and traditional art form with modern style, making their couture pieces in their studio home in Nanaimo, B.C., and manufacturing ready-wear in Vancouver, B.C. Ay Lelum has been awarded the distinction of the 2018 Indigenous Business of the Year Award in their category, through the BC Achievement Foundation and The City of Nanaimo Excellence in Culture Award 2021. Ay Lelum is also a verified Spotify Artist and is available on major streaming platforms.  

Due to their recent devastating loss, a crowd funding campaign has been set up and is available on their website and Facebook page. 

For more information and to view Artist biographies, visit: www.aylelum.com  

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AyLelum/  

Instagram: @aylelum  

Twitter: @aylelum  

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6InmJbzMlwHGlyVDxYrdO3 

www.globalfashioncollective.com  

Instagram: @globalfashioncollective 

FacebookGlobal Fashion Collective 

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