This Indigenous Clothing Company Combines Rural Roots with Today’s Urban Streetwear Culture

Vosq Clothing Co. was founded in concept, on the grounds of the Pechanga Indian Reservation in Southern California. According to Vosq Clothing Co. founder Nick Vassel, the goal was to create a brand his family and ancestors would be proud of, as well as a brand that his friends and community could relate to. “Our goal is to craft quality men’s apparel that empowers people through creativity and perspective to challenge their own fears and abilities,” Vassel explains. While Vosq Clothing Co.’s roots are rural, it’s ambition is global. “We seek to rejuvenate the narrative of the Native American community through quality products and community outreach. Especially in a manner, that people of all Indigenous backgrounds can relate to, take pride in and appreciate.”

ABOUT THE NEWEST COLLECTION: This most recent line was titled “Urban Rez” which sought to bring our rural roots and combine it with today’s urban “streetwear culture.” With a healthy combination of simplistic and more advanced designs, Vosq Clothing Co. strived to find the balance and not overdo the designs. Furthermore, they strategically photographed this line on the Pechanga Reservation to reinforce that “Urban Rez” theme.

Photo by Anderson Gould Jr.
Photo by Anderson Gould Jr.
Photo by Anderson Gould Jr.
Photo by Anderson Gould Jr.
Photo by Anderson Gould Jr.

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nativemax

Native Max is a brand and publication which features positive talents and stories of indigenous peoples of Indian Country.

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